DCSIMG

Fact Sheet: U.N. Security Council Resolution 2051 on Yemen



On June 12, 2012, the U.N. Security Council adopted a resolution reaffirming the need for the full and timely implementation of the democratic reforms laid out in the Gulf Cooperation Council Initiative and Implementation Mechanism. The Council emphasized the critical need for a cessation of all actions meant to disrupt the political transition in Yemen and expressed readiness to consider further measures to deter those attempting to derail political progress.

1) Resolution 2051 continues the Council’s active engagement on Yemen and reaffirms its support for Yemen’s political transition on the basis of the GCC Initiative and Implementation Mechanism, which were signed by the Yemenis on November 23, 2011.

2) Resolution 2051 identifies four important priorities to move the political transition forward, in line with the Implementation Mechanism:

1. convening an all-inclusive National Dialogue Conference,

2. restructuring of the security and armed forces under a unified professional national leadership structure and the ending of all armed conflicts,

3. identifying steps to address transitional justice and to support national reconciliation

4. implementing constitutional and electoral reform and holding of general elections by February 2014;

3) Resolution 2051 calls on all parties to comply with applicable international law, so that all those responsible for human rights violations are held fully accountable, and underlines the need for a comprehensive, independent, and impartial investigation consistent with international standards into alleged human rights abuses and violations, in order to prevent impunity.

4) Resolution 2051 highlights the Council’s readiness to consider further measures available under Article 41 of the UN Charter to deter any actions in Yemen aimed at undermining the Government of National Unity and the political transition, either through violent or politically divisive means.

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