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Award-Winning Chef Jose Andres Joins Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves as Culinary Ambassador

Helping to raise awareness of an issue that causes nearly two million deaths each year.



Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with Chef Jose Andres, Culinary Ambassador for the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves at the Department of State on September 13, 2011. State Department photo.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with Chef Jose Andres, Culinary Ambassador for the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves at the Department of State on September 13, 2011. State Department photo.

Chef Jose Andres joins the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves as “Culinary Ambassador,” helping to raise awareness of an issue that causes nearly two million deaths each year: toxic smoke from traditional cooking stoves. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, who launched the Alliance last year, today met with Chef Andres to thank him for his commitment and discuss their mutual interest and determination to bring clean cooking solutions to the developing world.

In his new role, Chef Andres, alongside Secretary Clinton, the United Nations Foundation, and a rapidly growing list of over 160 other Alliance partners, will be instrumental in achieving the Alliance’s ’100 by 20′ goal, which calls for 100 million homes to adopt clean and efficient stoves and fuels by 2020. Chef Andres’ passion for economic and social empowerment through sustainable, safe and clean cooking practices in the developing world has few rivals. After witnessing the impact of dirty cooking conditions while assisting in post-earthquake humanitarian relief efforts in Haiti, Chef Andres formed World Central Kitchen to deploy clean and innovative cooking solutions throughout the developing world.

Every day, nearly 3 billion people use a crude stove or open fire to cook their meals – typically fueled by biomass such as wood, charcoal or dung – in homes with poor or no ventilation. Exposure to smoke from these stoves has been categorized by the World Health Organization as the fifth biggest health risk factor in the developing world and causes two million people to die each year, mostly from acute pneumonia and chronic lung disease. The vast majority of deaths are among women and children in the developing world.

Encouraging the development and use of clean cookstoves in cultures, communities, and countries throughout the developing world is consistent with the core principles of U.S. foreign policy and development efforts, which focus on improving the lives of the world’s most vulnerable populations. In September 2010, Secretary Clinton announced the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves, a public-private partnership to save lives, improve livelihoods, empower women, and combat climate change by creating a thriving global market for clean and efficient household cooking solutions. The U.S. Government has committed more than $50 million over the first five years to the Alliance.

‘Clean stoves’ would save lives, cut pollution

Secretary Clinton’s Interview With Belinda Luscombe of Time Magazine

FACT SHEET: The U.S. Commitment to Cookstoves in India

FACT SHEET: The U.S. Commitment to Cookstoves in Africa

Additional African Nations to Join the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves

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