DCSIMG

FACT SHEET: Transition and Reform in Yemen



The United States seeks to promote democracy, human rights, civil society, and economic development in Yemen through an orderly, peaceful transition that is responsive to the aspirations of the Yemeni people. We call on the Yemeni security forces to refrain from violence and respect the rights of the Yemeni people to demonstrate peacefully. To ensure the security and stability of Yemen, we are also committed to eradicating the threat from al-Qa’ida in the Arabian Peninsula and other extremist elements.

Bilateral and Multilateral Assistance:   Together with our international partners, the United States provides critical support to bolster Yemen’s economy and security.

 The United States has increased its total assistance to Yemen—from $24 million in FY 2008 to $128 million in FY 2009 and $305 million in FY 2010.

We continue to broadly engage Yemen’s regional neighbors to coordinate support for Yemen through multilateral forums such as the Friends of Yemen process. We also support the involvement of international financial institutions and their commitment to a reform agenda for Yemen.

Partnership with the Yemeni People:   The United States supports the Yemeni people in their pursuit of a more secure, unified, and prosperous nation. In fact, we have increased our assistance to civilians from $16 million in FY 2008 to $50 million in FY 2009 and $128 million in FY 2010. We are already providing over 400,000 internally displaced and conflict-affected Yemenis with humanitarian assistance including clean water, food vouchers, and medical services.

In response to the current unrest, the United States is:

Providing medical consumables to the Science and Technology Hospital and field clinics treating wounded pro-democracy protestors near Sana’a University;

Providing equipment and supplies to facilities in Aden and Abyan treating victims of clashes between protestors and security forces;

Providing medical equipment and consumables to the Amran General Hospital, amid increasing clashes involving tribal factions and military units;

Repairing roads in order to improve livelihoods and facilitate access to health care facilities; and

Training local government leaders in crisis response and conflict management.

Increased Support for Transition and Reform:   As part of the U.S. government’s ongoing development efforts in Yemen, the United States is implementing a comprehensive political and economic reform initiative, in addition to the security assistance already underway.

Since protests began in Yemen in mid-January, the U.S. Embassy in Sana’a has expanded its contacts with political, tribal, and civil society actors. U.S. diplomats are reaching out to government leaders, the opposition, and student protesters to promote dialogue and a peaceful and orderly transfer of power. 

The U.S. government is partnering with Yemen civil society to promote responsible and representative political parties, effective non-governmental organizations, independent media, full civic participation by women, and a responsive educational system.

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